google-site-verification: google935433b691795853.html KRISTY BERRIDGE

Thursday, 23 February 2017

Talk of Marriage
Talk of marriage has sprung up more than once in my household this week and to say that I'm both pleased and petrified by the thought would only be an admission of truth.

I suspect it might be the dream of many women globally to have the love of their life proclaim their undying devotion and desires for a future unending and filled with marital bliss. I'm not all that different, I even wonder occasionally how he will do it; billboard proposal, one knee, ring in a wine glass?

The truth is the thought of our beloved lavishing us with hefty bouts of attention and adorning us with jewellery is a major drawcard to the sacred union, but what if your partner insists the shoe be on the other foot? What if he refuses to propose in the hopes that you do all the hard work for him?

Enter the modern man; expectations of equality have been raised by the modern woman, so why wouldn't he expect the idea of marriage proposals to be a two-way street?
I can't say I disagree, but even the modern woman wishes that romance was a candle not so quickly extinguished by the ideas of the 21st century. We want our cake and to eat it too and perhaps this is grossly unfair in this day and age, but when my boyfriend wishes I'd propose the idea of a life together, pick my own ring and organise everything before, during and after; I almost want to slap modern day feminists for inciting this role reversal!

When did this happen? When did my partner suddenly decide that he too deserved to be lavished with the attention and surprise of pending nuptials?

I have no answer and flatly refuse to give into this bid for equal rights. Perhaps I am selfish and old fashioned, but I'm also more than aware that on the relationship see-saw I don't ask for more than a partner can give and in this instance, I can keep teetering, bouncing up and down with the currents of our relationship until bended knee and extravagant rings appear.


Kristy :)

Saturday, 18 February 2017


10 Reasons why you should travel instead of work!
10. You’re not at work.
I’m sorry but this is flat out the best reason on the planet. Although you may love your job, there is nothing better than waking up to zero expectations and taking the day as it comes and frolicking in the possibility of ‘what if’.
9. You experience a whole new country.
There’s nothing better than the safety and comfort of your own backyard, but sometimes to be able to step into an ocean ten thousand miles away or explore uninhabited bushland or climb pyramids built eons before can open your eyes to a plethora of opportunity. Perhaps your conventional way of living may be inspired by the landscape of somewhere new or your palette cleansed to try a whole host of new and inviting cuisine. Exploring a country of unknown origin is often bursting with excitement and teaming with memories you will never forget.
8. New food.
At work we’re often slotting coins into the vending machine, scouring the canteen for something edible or pushing a homemade salad around the plate. When you’re travelling, you’re forced to try foods you might otherwise ignore when at home and within driving distance of a fast-food restaurant or supermarket. To step outside the comfort zone and taste what a new country has to offer is adventure in itself … unless you get gastro. That sucks.
7. Learning a new language.
There’s nothing wrong with English, it’s one of the most complex and beautiful languages on the planet, but you gotta admit, it’s kind of sexy to speak French or exciting to converse in Arabic.
6. New opportunities.
When travelling, you really don’t know what sort of opportunities might come your way. It could mean an entire lifestyle change; moving to a foreign country of choice, a new city because more exciting job opportunities may wait or even the ability to volunteer in remote and poor communities to satisfy the humanitarian within.
5. Culture.
Believe it or not, experiencing a new culture is paramount to growth as an individual. To be able to see the world through another’s eyes and compare that lifestyle to what you already know and accept is both humbling and life-altering. Sometimes the culture of another country is so far removed from what we consider expectation that it forces you to broaden your horizons and objectively see things from a new perspective.
4. Bills.
The honest truth is; if you’re travelling and not working then it probably means you don’t have any immediate bills to consider and I really I can’t see anything wrong with that. Unless of course you were a buffoon who booked everything on credit and will one day soon be forced to face the mounting debt of hasty decision making. The question then is: was it worth it?
3. Relationships.
As far as I’m concerned and, if your partner and family are with you, it tests boundaries and offers new ways to be cohesive when under suffrage of the same environment. However, if separated, then these bonds can be strengthened or severed depending on what you hope to achieve by the distance in travelling.
2. Casual Fridays.
When at work it’s a rarity to have a casual day where you no longer have to don the sleepwear style blouse or trademark black pants and safety shoes. When travelling you can wear whatever you want and often avoid the pesky laundering bills involved with keeping your work wear attire fresh.
1.Adventure.
How can you ever have an adventure when shackled to the desk for a nine-to-five? The number one reason anyone travels is to experience a new adventure—something outside the beacon of normality and filled with the possibility of something slightly more exciting then pen pushing and number crunching.


Kristy

Wednesday, 15 February 2017

How nice is nice?
How nice is too nice? Is there such a thing?
A lot of people would say that in a world filled with suffering, oppression, arrogance and disregard, being too nice couldn't possibly be something worthy of complaint. Usually I would agree, the world is seriously lacking in the sincerity and general kindness that this post hopes to inspire.

But what if your existence is nothing but a few thousand cubic meters of space and filled with people not generally influenced by the world on mass?

My town, for instance, is tucked away in the northern end of Australia; population approximately 160,000. There's enough people to create eccentricity, variation of cultural and religious belief as well as a government based on the ideals of the country's overall agenda, but still far enough removed to remain independent of major political upheaval. In this tiny town we may know the person living right next door or we may live with the window shades drawn in the hopes to remain anonymous; basic niceties are still expected regardless.

Being nice, to me, is respecting each individual's choices to live breathe and work within this environment without judgement or expectation of certain behaviours. Being too nice would entail dropping baked goods on doorsteps each day or friends and colleagues calling hourly to check on one's wellbeing.

To be nice (or merely human) is to be considerate of your fellow man; let them merge into your traffic lane during rush hour. Let the neighbour's kids play cricket in your front yard when there's no safe place elsewhere. Let the elderly have your seat on public transport and of course, respect everyone's opinions yet still value your own.

It's all about balance. Being too nice isn't really a first world problem and to be fair, not the worst thing that anyone could encounter. There's no issue with overextending oneself or elaborating kindness; it can be annoying, but still much better than the alternative which is to not care at all. I personally know which one I'd prefer even if I do like to keep the shades drawn most days.


Kristy

Saturday, 4 February 2017

The Psychology of Colour!

The psychology of colour is a very real thing and has been adapted by many designers and decorators throughout the centuries in order to promote certain moods or to encourage the execution of certain activities within a space. Colour can demonstrate strength and compassion, weakness or fear.

Colour is often chosen based on the marketing techniques adopted by paint companies, in vogue designers or even magazines. If we are shown images of a certain colour palette and its possibilities often enough, we more often than not start to feel that this popular—often passing trend—might in fact be the perfect solution to own decorating needs. This is not exactly scientific, but it does prove the point of susceptibility in those impressionable and easily swayed by clever marketing techniques.

Colour—in a more scientific approach— is more often than not selected based on personal urge and the mood needed to be generated within the space. Corporate and construction often play with black and white for its strong, precise and credible simplicity. You might also see this in the fashion and makeup industry as a solid base for building a greater label.

Red is considered dangerous, sexy and inspires the appetite, so it’s often relegated to restaurants and bars, sports and recreation as well as anything to do with the sex industry. Green is earthy and organic, adopted mostly in the nutritional industry, medicine and even tourism. Blue is calming and clinical. You’ll often find this in dental and medical facilities, information technology companies and sometimes in corporate situations.

There are a million other colours to choose from, each with a psychological or scientific purpose behind what the hue generally propagates in the human mind and thus your decision to apply yellow paint to your child’s bedroom is more often than not, a choice made unconsciously, driven by some emotional reaction, but mostly clever marketing and the generalised use of the colour in certain applications.


Kristy J

Friday, 27 January 2017

When are you too old to work?
If I answered this question from the bottom of my heart, I’d probably say it’s around about the time the nappies come off. Let’s face it, age is irrelevant when the inclination to never clock a time card, lift a shovel, educate the young, enter nonsensical data or stitch up cuts is forever in the forefront of our lazy minds.

It is a rarity indeed to meet someone who actually enjoys pulling time at a nine-to-five. Work is merely a consequence of existence, a way of life we humans have propagated since the time of bartering and monetary exchange. There is no such thing as a free ride and work has simply become a fact of life.

So the question of what age is too old to reel in an income really comes down to personal choice. Obviously there are physical factors that come into play: disabilities, declining function of limbs, vision impairment or mental faculties fading. These all play very relative roles in whether or not you are simply too old to go on making a contribution to society through paid exchange of work.

However, there has been plenty of research into the decline of the elderly post retirement and these studies have actually proven that as human beings we require purpose in order to function. So even if you have decided to throw in the proverbial work towel because it’s becoming a drag to tote your colostomy bag around, make sure you stay active—both physically and mentally. You don’t want to kick the bucket weeks after you finally decide to enjoy your retirement only to find your children will spend the inheritance on booze and cheap strippers.

Needless to say, work as long as you enjoy it, as long as you are physically and mentally capable and then make damn sure you spend all your hard-earned cash on yourself and partner. Don’t leave an inheritance and don’t worry about what happens when you’re gone, because life will almost certainly always progress forward whether you work yourself to the bone or live a life of relative happiness.


Kristy